Geothermal Info

A geothermal system uses of series of underground pipes called a “loop,” which are buried between 10-300 feet, where the earth’s temperature remains constant. These loops lay in 100-400 feet trenches, if installed horizontally and if space is available, or vertically, if not. The earth loop eliminates the need for fossil fuels. Also, they can be hidden under a landscaped area, a field or parking lot, etc.

These heat pumps pull heat from the Earth and distribute it through a conventional duct system, or a hot water tank. To cool, the system extracts heat from the building and pumps it into the earth loop, reversing the system.

While the cost of drilling and exploration may be expensive, in the long run, geothermal energy will factor in technology, energy prices, subsidies and interest rate decisions, from single housing to industry. Through government assisted research, and industry experience, the cost of generating geothermal power has decreased by 25% over the past two decades. The average home installation costs from $20,000 - $25,000. Upon installation there is a 30 percent federal tax credit available, which typically saves homeowners between $6,000 and $7,500. Long-term and financing with approved credit coupled with reduced utility bills make geothermal an investment that begins to pay real monetary dividends within a few years.

Contact Performance Heating and Cooling for a no-obligation quote and a full explanation on geothermal system that is right for you.

[The technician] was so nice, knew what he was doing, answered all my questions, and removed his shoes before entering the house.

Mrs. Burnette